FIELD RESEARCH PROJECTS
Information Sheet
VISUAL TOUR OF STRATIFICATION IN THE DETROIT AREA
DUE WEEK 9


Each field research project will be evaluated/graded according to the following criteria: 1) data collection (25%), 2) data analysis (25%), 3) use of supplementary materials (25%), and 4) presentation of findings (25%).  Your group will be required to fill out a grade sheet (one per group)  which explicitly states what you have done for each phase of the project.   


DATA COLLECTION
	This initial phase represents the greatest difficulty of this particular project.  You are to take pictures or video footage of various locations in the greater Detroit Metropolitan area (or you may choose to stay within the city limits).  You tour should include the AT LEAST FIVE of the following elements: housing and neighborhoods, retail stores, health care facilities, churches, places of work, schools, recreational facilities, and/or available transportation.  The idea is to capture visual images which represent the disparities experienced by individuals at varying socio-economic levels.  More specifically, your research question is how do people experience our society differently as a result of their positions in systems of stratification?  

DATA ANALYSIS
The analysis for this project will be different than most of the others.  You research question is largely descriptive, hence it calls for you to carefully pull together the images you have collected in a way which communicates how social structure impacts individuals lived experiences.  You may want to incorporate the use of music in your presentation.


USE OF SUPPLEMENTARY MATERIALS
You should be prepared to discuss why and how differences in socio-economic status, race, and gender effect the differences in the way you observe people living.  You will be able to answer these questions by using some of the outside reading suggested below and from our discussions about inequality in class.  I have suggested several readings listed below which can be located in the Eschelman library or may be borrowed from my personal collection (remember, I know where you live!).  You will be required to cite the relevant literature in your presentation.  This means that you should select 1-2 of the items if you are an individual, or all of the items if you are a group and determine the main argument from them.  You will be expected to provide a sociologial explanation of why people experience society differently which encorporates the work which currently exists in the field.

Some outside reading you may want to look at includes:
Hacker, Andrew J. (1992).  Two Nations: Black and White; Sepaarate, Hostile, Unequal.  New
	York: Ballentine Books.
Jencks, Christopher.  (1995).  The Homeless.  Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press.
Massey, Douglas and Nancy Denton. (1993).  American apartheid: Segregation and the making of 	the underclass.  Cambridge, Mass:  Harvard University Press, 
Oliver, Melvin and Thomas Shapiro.  (1995).   Black Wealth, White Wealth: A New Perspective on
	Racial Inequality.   New York: Routledge.
Wilson, W. J. (1987).  The Truly Disadvantaged: The Inner City, the Underclass, and Public Policy. 
	Chicago: University of Chicago Press.

PRESENTATION OF FINDINGS:
This project calls for a great deal of creativity in its presentation.  I will be looking to see how effectively you are able to convey the degrees of lived inequality to the members of the class.  How well you are able to explain these differences in terms of structural factors.


PROGRESS REPORT:
You will need to provide me with a progress report in the Week 6 of the course which details what you have accomplished on each phase (Data collection, analysis, supplementary materials, and your presentation) of your field research project.


                   FIELD RESEARCH PROJECTS
                       Information Sheet
RESIDENTIAL SEGREGATION IN DETROIT: EXPLORING THE 8-MILE DIVIDE
                          DUE WEEK 11
                                

Each field research project will be evaluated/graded according to the following criteria: 1) data
collection (25%), 2) data analysis (25%), 3) use of supplementary materials (25%), and 4)
presentation of findings (25%).  Your group will be required to fill out a grade sheet (one per group) 
which explicitly states what you have done for each phase of the project.   


DATA COLLECTION
This initial phase represents the greatest difficulty in this particular project.  You will need to gather
demographic data on the different areas of the Detroit Metropolitan area.  This data is most readily 
found using the US Census which has broken up differing areas into ‘Census Tracks'.  There are
several ways of getting the Census data, the easiest however is by using the Internet.  If you have
difficulty obtaining Internet access in the library, let me know immediately and we will make
alternative arrangements.  There are several pieces of information that you will want to obtain about
each Census track.  This information includes: 1) the average education level, 2) the average income,
3) the average price of housing, 4) the racial composition, and 5) employment rate.


DATA ANALYSIS
Your research question is a descriptive one, so the task of your analysis is to put together the data
you have collected in a way which accurately and concisely conveys to members of the class the
socio-economic and racial composition of various Census Tracks in the greater metropolitan Detroit
area.  You may choose to present a detailed map to the class, you may want to provide a series of
charts, or you may think of an alternative way to convey the information.


USE OF SUPPLEMENTARY MATERIALS
While collecting and presenting the descriptive data are the bulk of your task, you should be able to
use the supplementary literature to answer questions about the relationship between SES and 
housing patterns, or between race and housing patterns.  You should push yourself to consider the
broader structural issues at hand, such as the effects that the observed housing patterns have on race
relations. You will be able to answer these questions by using some of the outside reading suggested
below  and from our discussions about inequality in class.  I have suggested several readings listed
below which can be located in the Eschelman library or may be borrowed from my personal
collection (remember, I know where you live!).  You will be required to cite the relevant literature
in your presentation.  This means that you should select 1-2 of the items if you are an individual, or
all of the items if you are a group and determine the main argument from them.  You will be
expected to provide a sociologial explanation of why people experience society differently which
encorporates the work which currently exists in the field.


(Cont.)
Some outside reading you may want to look at includes:

Hacker, Andrew J. (1992).  Two Nations: Black and White; Sepaarate, Hostile, Unequal.  New
     York: Ballentine Books.
Jencks, Christopher.  (1995).  The Homeless.  Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press.
Massey, Douglas and Nancy Denton. (1993).  American apartheid: Segregation and the making of
     the underclass.  Cambridge, Mass:  Harvard University Press, 
Oliver, Melvin and Thomas Shapiro.  (1995).   Black Wealth, White Wealth: A New Perspective on
     Racial Inequality.   New York: Routledge.
Wilson, W. J. (1987).  The Truly Disadvantaged: The Inner City, the Underclass, and Public Policy. 
     Chicago: University of Chicago Press.



PRESENTATION OF FINDINGS
This project calls for a great deal of creativity in its presentation.  I will be looking to see how
effectively you are able to the portray degree of residential segregation in our own area to the
members of the class.  I will also be evaluating how you are able to situate your presentation within
the arguments of the existing literature and field questions from the class.


PROGRESS REPORT:
You will need to provide me with a progress report in the Week 6 of the course which details
what you have accomplished on each phase (Data collection, analysis, supplementary materials,
and your presentation) of your field research project.



                   FIELD RESEARCH PROJECTS
                       Information Sheet
                      GOOD DRUGS/BAD DRUGS
                           DUE WEEK 7

Each field research project will be evaluated/graded according to the following criteria: 1) data
collection (25%), 2) data analysis (25%), 3) use of supplementary materials (25%), and 4)
presentation of findings (25%).  Your group will be required to fill out a grade sheet (one per group) 
which explicitly states what you have done for each phase of the project.   


DATA COLLECTION
What is a drug?  How do we define it?  What drugs do we consume?  What are good drugs and what
are bad drugs?  What determines whether they are good or bad?  Why do we consume drugs?  What
are the social contexts in which drug use is consumed?  What social contexts are defined as
normative, what contexts are defined as deviant?  Who controls the definition of these contexts and
the consumption of drugs?  Sources of information:  pharmacist, drug counselor, law enforcement
officials, and various consumers of drugs (both ‘good' and ‘bad') which need not be identified by
name.  


DATA ANALYSIS, USE OF SUPPLEMENTARY MATERIALS, AND PRESENTATION OF
THE FINDINGS
You will want to read your textbook very closely to understand the different types of theories which
are used to explain deviance.  There are functionalist explanations (Deviance and social bonds;
structural strain; opportunity and control theory), conflict explanations (deviant subcultures, class
dominance, and sturctural contradiction theory), and Symbolic Interactionist explanations (labeling
and cultural transmission theories).  It will be necessary for you (or your group) to decide which
perspective you will approach your field research project from, or if you will use some combination
of theories and paradigmatic approaches.  Your data collection, analysis, and presentation will hinge
upon the type of explanation(s) which you choose to explore this theme. Please see me if this is
unclear.  

Below I have suggested two possible readings to get you started - I would suggest however, that
when you have decided upon your theoretical orientation, you review the primary sources cited in
the textbook.

Coleman, James William.  (1994).  The Criminal Elite: The Sociology of White-Collar Crime.  New
     York: St. Martin's Press. 
Becker, Howard.  (19 ).  "On Becoming a Marijuana User."  In Outsiders: Studies in the Sociology
     of Deviance.   New York: The Free Press.

PROGRESS REPORT: 
This is one of the earliest projects due so I will need a progress report from your group by Week 4
(that's next week) detailing where you are headed, both theoretically and empirically.


                    FIELD RESEARCH PROJECTS
                       Information Sheet
 WHAT ARE THE MESSAGES IN CHILDREN'S VIDEOS AND TV PROGRAMMING?
                          DUE WEEK 14
                                
Each field research project will be evaluated/graded according to the following criteria: 1) data
collection (25%), 2) data analysis (25%), 3) use of supplementary materials (25%), and 4)
presentation of findings (25%).  Your group will be required to fill out a grade sheet (one per
group)  which explicitly states what you have done for each phase of the project.   
  
DATA COLLECTION
Review five of the most popular children's videos.  Focus on animated programming since it is
generally targeted at the youngest children.  You may also channel surf children's programs and
identify themes.  How are males and females portrayed?  What implicit roles do social class and
ethnicity play?  What problems are presented to be solved an how are they solved?  How are
villains portrayed?  How are heroes portrayed?  This is a content analysis of television
programming and cinema

DATA ANALYSIS
You will need to first, formulate a series of categories which you will use to conceptually explore
the programming.  These categories should be guided by the questions laid out above and by your
theoretical orientation.  Once you have laid out the categories, you will need to view the video's
or programs with a meticulous eye to pull out material which speaks to your categorizations.  This
process is called ‘coding' the data (the data being your videos).  If you are working in a group,
you will want to code the data separately, then get back together to discuss how you each coded
the data - what are the similarities and differences between yourself and your colleagues?  What
does your coding schema allow you to say about the videos?  How can you situate you
understanding of the videos within the larger framework of our discussion on media as an social
institution?  

USE OF SUPPLEMENTARY MATERIALS
You must carefully review the chapter in the textbook on the media.  You may have to read ahead
to do this.  You will also want to do a search in the library to find any relevant sociological
studies which focus on children's literature and socialization.

PRESENTATION OF THE FINDINGS
You may present your findings in any way that you deem appropriate.  You may want to create
tables which describe the occurances of certain themes.  You may want to play snippets of your
video's to illustrate your main ideas.  You may want to engage the class in some sort of activity. 
It is up to you, or your group, however you will want to come up with some sort of clever way to
articulate your findings that maintains the interest of the class.  You will have a better idea of how
to present your findings once you have completed the data analysis.  You should plan to limit
your presentation to 20-30 minutes.


PROGRESS REPORT:
You will need to provide me with a progress report in the Week 6 of the course which details
what you have accomplished on each phase (Data collection, analysis, supplementary materials,
and your presentation) of your field research project.  




                        FIELD RESEARCH PROJECTS
                           Information Sheet
                             WHAT IS NEWS?
                              DUE WEEK 14

Each field research project will be evaluated/graded according to the following criteria: 1) data collection
(25%), 2) data analysis (25%), 3) use of supplementary materials (25%), and 4) presentation of findings
(25%).  Your group will be required to fill out a grade sheet (one per group)  which explicitly states what
you have done for each phase of the project.   
  
DATA COLLECTION
What are the dominant messages in the newspapers that we read?  What are the principle themes or issues? 
What aspects of our society are not presented?  Who defines what is news?  From whose perspective in the
society do we define news? 

DATA ANALYSIS
This project requires both a content analysis and interviews with news editors about what determines 'what
is news'.  You will need to first, formulate a series of categories which you will use to conceptually explore
the a select group of newspapers and/or news magazines.  These categories should be guided by the
questions laid out above and by your theoretical orientation.  Once you have laid out the categories, you will
need to read the texts with  a meticulous eye to pull out material which speaks to your categorizations.  This
process is called ‘coding' the data (the data being your chosen newspapers and/or news magazines).  If you
are working in a group, you will want to code the data separately, then get back together to discuss how you
each coded the data - what are the similarities and differences between yourself and your colleagues?  If you
are working alone you will need to pass through the data (at least) three separate times to ensure that you are
not missing any particularities.  What does your coding schema allow you to say about the messages in the
news?  How can you situate you understanding of the news within the larger framework of our discussion
on media as an social institution?  


USE OF SUPPLEMENTARY MATERIALS
You must carefully review the chapter in the textbook on the media.  You may have to read ahead to do this. 
You will also want to do a search in the library to find any relevant sociological studies which focus on the
ideology in the media.

PRESENTATION OF THE FINDINGS
You may present your findings in any way that you deem appropriate.  You may want to create tables which
describe the occurances of certain themes.  You may want to play snipets of your newspaper text  to
illustrate your main ideas.  You may want to engage the class in some sort of activity.  It is up to you, or
your group, however you will want to come up with some sort of clever way to articulate your findings that
maintains the interest of the class.  You will have a better idea of how to present your findings once you
have completed the data analysis.  You should plan to limit your presentation to 20-30 minutes.



PROGRESS REPORT:
You will need to provide me with a progress report in the Week 6 of the course which details what you have
accomplished on each phase (Data collection, analysis, supplementary materials, and your presentation) of
your field research project.


                        FIELD RESEARCH PROJECTS
                           Information Sheet
                            SEX AND VIOLENCE
                               DUE WEEK 7

Each field research project will be evaluated/graded according to the following criteria: 1) data collection
(25%), 2) data analysis (25%), 3) use of supplementary materials (25%), and 4) presentation of findings
(25%).  Your group will be required to fill out a grade sheet (one per group)  which explicitly states what
you have done for each phase of the project.   
  
DATA COLLECTION
How are sex and violence presented to us in our society?  First focus on sex - what are the messages in the
media on sexual relations.  How is sex portrayed in music, cinema, literature and advertising?  What is
pornography?  Describe examples of pornography in each area.  What do  they have in common?  What
types of sexual interactions are presented as legitimate?  What types of sexual interactions are presented as
illegitimate?  What are the outlets for sexual interaction in our society?  Where and with whom can one
have sex?   What are the regulations of sexual behavior?  why do these regulations exist?  What are the
harms that are being prevented?  How does this relate to what at is portrayed in the media?  Now focus on
violence, what are the messages in the media on violence?  What types of violence are presented?   Who are
the victims, who are the perpetrators?  When is violence good and when is it bad?  Are there standards
defining violence as "pornographic"?  What are the outlets for violence in our society?  Where and with
whom can one be violent to?  What are the regulations on violent behavior?  Why do these regulations
exist?  What are the harms that are being prevented/  How does this relate to what is portrayed in the media? 
Are there connections between sex and violence?  What are these connections and where do you see them? 


DATA ANALYSIS
This project requires a content analysis of media presentation of sex and violence.  You will need to first,
formulate a series of categories which you will use to conceptually explore the  select group of media you
have gathered as data.  These categories should be guided by the questions laid out above and by your
theoretical orientation.  Once you have laid out the categories, you will need to read your data with  a
meticulous eye to pull out material which speaks to your categorizations.  This process is called ‘coding' the
data (the data being your chosen media).  If you are working in a group, you will want to code the data
separately, then get back together to discuss how you each coded the data - what are the similarities and
differences between yourself and your colleagues?  If you are working alone you will need to pass through
the data (at least) three separate times to ensure that you are not missing any particularities.  What does your
coding schema allow you to say about the representations of sex and violence in the media?  How can you
situate your understanding of the sex and violence in the media within the larger framework of our
discussion on media as an social institution?  


USE OF SUPPLEMENTARY MATERIALS
You must carefully review the chapter in the textbook on the media and the chapter on gender.  You may
have to read ahead to do this.  You will also want to do a search in the library to find any relevant
sociological studies which focus on the sex and violence in the media.

PRESENTATION OF THE FINDINGS
You may present your findings in any way that you deem appropriate.  You may want to create tables which
describe the occurances of certain themes.  You may want to use snippets from your data (within reason) to
illustrate your main ideas.  You may want to engage the class in some sort of activity.  It is up to you, or
your group, however you will want to come up with some sort of clever way to articulate your findings that
maintains the interest of the class.  You will have a better idea of how to present your findings once you
have completed the data analysis.  You should plan to limit your presentation to 20-30 minutes.

PROGRESS REPORT:
You will need to provide me with a progress report in the Week 5 of the course which details what you have
accomplished on each phase (Data collection, analysis, supplementary materials, and your presentation) of
your field research project.




Researchers:

 FIELD RESEARCH PROJECTS
                          Information Sheet
             RACE AND IDENTITY - THE BIRACIAL EXPERIENCE
                             DUE WEEK 11
                                  
Each field research project will be evaluated/graded according to the following criteria: 1) data
collection (25%), 2) data analysis (25%), 3) use of supplementary materials (25%), and 4) presentation
of findings (25%).  Your group will be required to fill out a grade sheet (one per group)  which explicitly
states what you have done for each phase of the project.   
  
DATA COLLECTION
What does the term 'identity' mean?  How do we figure out who we are and where we fit into society? 
What happens to people who fit between socially rigid categorizations?  How do they understand their
racial identity - as Black, White, biracial, or something else?  This project requires you to locate and
interview ten people who have one Black and one White parent about how they identify themselves and
the social factors that have influenced their choice(s). 

DATA ANALYSIS
You will need to either create a questionnaire, or you may use the one that I have used for my
dissertation - it is up to you.  Once you have collected the interview data, it will be necessary for you to
do a content analysis of the interviews. Specifically, you will need to formulate figure out what the main
conceptual categories of my questionnaire are or, if you create your own, you will need to revisit those
categories.  Once you have laid out the categories, you will need to read your data with  a meticulous eye
to pull out material which speaks to your categorizations.  This process is called ‘coding' the data (the
data being your chosen media).  If you are working in a group, you will want to code the data separately,
then get back together to discuss how you each coded the data - what are the similarities and differences
between yourself and your colleagues?  If you are working alone you will need to pass through the data
(at least) three separate times to ensure that you are not missing any particularities.  What does your
coding schema allow you to say about how people who are biracial understand their identity(ies)?  Do
the people you interviewed have different strategies for how they identify themselves (i.e. do some
consider themselves as Black, others as biracial, others as different things in different contexts?).  What
factors from your interviews can you say lead people to identify one way and not anther.   How can you
situate your understanding of racial identity within the larger framework of our discussion on the social
construction of race?
  
USE OF SUPPLEMENTARY MATERIALS
I have attached a copy of a paper I have recently had published in order for you to get an idea of what
my work looks like.  You will want to read the chapter on race in our textbook very carefully
(particularly the section on the social construction of race).  You may also want to look through the
following materials (they may be available in the library or may be borrowed from my private
collection):

Davis, F. James. (1991).  Who Is Black?:  One Nation's Definition.  University Park, PA:  Penn State
     Press.
Root, Maria P. P. (Ed.). (1996).  The Multiracial Experience:  Racial Borders as the New Frontier. 
     Thousand Oaks:  Sage.
Root, Maria .P.P. (Ed.) (1992)., Racially Mixed People in America.  Newbury Park, CA:  Sage.
Funderburg, Lise. (1994).  Black, White, Other:  Biracial Americans Talk about Race and Identity.
     New York:  William Morrow and Company.
Jones, Lisa. (1990).  Bulletproof Diva:  Tales of Race, Sex and Hair.  New York:  Doubleday.


PRESENTATION OF THE FINDINGS
You may present your findings in any way that you deem appropriate.  You may want to create tables
which describe your findings.  You may want to read snipets from your interview data  to illustrate your
main ideas.  You may want to engage the class in some sort of activity.  It is up to you, or your group,
however you will want to come up with some sort of clever way to articulate your findings that
maintains the interest of the class.  You will have a better idea of how to present your findings once you
have completed the data analysis.  You should plan to limit your presentation to 20-30 minutes.


PROGRESS REPORT:
You will need to provide me with a progress report in the Week 6 of the course which details what you
have accomplished on each phase (Data collection, analysis, supplementary materials, and your
presentation) of your field research project.

                       FIELD RESEARCH PROJECTS
                          Information Sheet
                          MUSIC AND CULTURE
                              DUE WEEK 14
Each field research project will be evaluated/graded according to the following criteria: 1) data
collection (25%), 2) data analysis (25%), 3) use of supplementary materials (25%), and 4) presentation
of findings (25%).  Your group will be required to fill out a grade sheet (one per group)  which explicitly
states what you have done for each phase of the project.   
  


DATA COLLECTION
Analyze five music videos and the lyrics from five songs which could be classified as 'gangsta rap.'  What images are being projected in the videos?  How is violence portrayed?  How are men and women represented in the videos and music?  What do these representations say about what it means to be masculine or feminine?  Do these images influence how men and women think about themselves and each other?  What role does race play in the imagery?  What effect does this music have on youth culture?  Who  are the major decision-makers in the industry and how do they shape the music?  This project is a detailed content analysis of music videos and rap lyrics and requires some background research into the organization of the music industry.  


DATA ANALYSIS
This project requires a content analysis of music and music videos.  You will need to first, formulate a series of categories which you will use to conceptually explore the select group of songs and videos you have gathered as data.  These categories should be guided by the questions laid out above and by your theoretical orientation.  Once you have laid out the categories, you will need to read your data with  a meticulous eye to pull out material which speaks to your categorizations.  This process is called ‘coding' the data (the data being your chosen media).  If you are working in a group, you will want to code the data separately, then get back together to discuss how you each coded the data - what are the similarities and differences between yourself and your colleagues?  If you are working alone you will need to pass through the data (at least) three separate times to ensure that you are not missing any particularities.  What does your coding schema allow you to say about the cultural representations in music videos?  How can you situate these understandings within the larger framework of our discussion on media as a social institution?  You may find your information on the organization of the music industry in any way that you feel necessary.  You may want to search for the information on the Internet, you may look in various business references, you may want to call the manager of a record store, ect.

USE OF SUPPLEMENTARY MATERIALS
You must carefully review the chapter in the textbook on the media.  You may have to read ahead to do this.  You will also want to do a search in the library to find any relevant sociological studies which focus on the music and culture.  You may also want to look at the following book which has several provocative chapters about rap music and culture.

Hooks, bell ( 1992).  Black Looks: Race and Representation.  Boston: South End Press.
Hooks, bell (1996).  Outlaw Culture.  New York: Routledge.
PRESENTATION OF THE FINDINGS
You may present your findings in any way that you deem appropriate.  You may want to create tables which describe the occurances of certain themes.  You may want to play snippets of your music or videos (within reason) to illustrate your main ideas.  You may want to engage the class in some sort of activity.  It is up to you, or your group, however you will want to come up with some sort of clever way to articulate your findings that maintains the interest of the class.  You will have a better idea of how to present your findings once you have completed the data analysis.  You should plan to limit your presentation to 20-30 minutes.


PRESENTATION OF THE FINDINGS

PROGRESS REPORT:
You will need to provide me with a progress report in the Week 6 of the course which details what you have accomplished on each phase (Data collection, analysis, supplementary materials, and your presentation) of your field research project.


Researchers:
Section 02	Section 07	Section 11	Section 16	Section 17
			Schreiber
	Vitale
			Alston
	
			Elemont
Arrington	




                    FIELD RESEARCH PROJECTS
         AGENTS OF SOCIALIZATION: GENDER AND THE MEDIA
                       Information Sheet
                          DUE WEEK 13



Each field research project will be evaluated/graded according to the following criteria: 1) data
collection (25%), 2) data analysis (25%), 3) use of supplementary materials (25%), and 4) presentation
of findings (25%).  Your group will be required to fill out a grade sheet (one per group)  which explicitly
states what you have done for each phase of the project.   
  
DATA COLLECTION
What messages are communicated to women through the media?  What does it mean to be 'feminine'
according to magazines such as Essence, Glamour, Cosmopolitan, Seventeen, or Ms.  How is femininity
defined similarly and differently in these different magazines?  What ethnic and racial differences exist
in definitions of beauty?  To what degree do women use these images to assess or shape their own
beauty or femininity?  How many women read each of these magazines on a regular basis?  Who owns
and produces these magazines?  Does this type of media serve as an agent of socialization, or are the
magazines purely entertainment?  

DATA ANALYSIS
This project will require detailed content analysis of magazines geared towards women as well as some
background research into the magazine readership and demographics.  You will need to first, formulate a
series of categories which you will use to conceptually explore the select group of magazines  you have
gathered as data.  These categories should be guided by the questions laid out above and by your
theoretical orientation.  Once you have laid out the categories, you will need to read your data with  a
meticulous eye to pull out material which speaks to your categorizations.  This process is called ‘coding'
the data (the data being your magazines).  If you are working in a group, you will want to code the data
separately, then get back together to discuss how you each coded the data - what are the similarities and
differences between yourself and your colleagues?  If you are working alone you will need to pass
through the data (at least) three separate times to ensure that you are not missing any particularities. 
What does your coding schema allow you to say about the gender socialization and the media?  How can
you situate these understandings within the larger framework of our discussion on media as a social
institution?  You may find your background information on the organization of the magazines in any
way that you feel necessary.  You may want to search for the information on the Internet, you may look
in various business references, you may want to call the magazines main office, ect.


USE OF SUPPLEMENTARY MATERIALS
You must carefully review the chapter in the textbook on the media, gender and socialization.  You may
have to read ahead to do this.  You will also want to do a search in the library to find any relevant
sociological studies which focus on the socialization and the media. 


PRESENTATION OF THE FINDINGS
You may present your findings in any way that you deem appropriate.  You may want to create tables
which describe the occurances of certain themes.  You may want to display or read snippets from your
magazines to illustrate your main ideas.  You may want to create a poster display which organizes the
images by categories.  You may want to engage the class in some sort of activity.  It is up to you, or your
group, however you will want to come up with some sort of clever way to articulate your findings that
maintains the interest of the class.  You will have a better idea of how to present your findings once you
have completed the data analysis.  You should plan to limit your presentation to 20-30 minutes.


PROGRESS REPORT:
You will need to provide me with a progress report in the Week 6 of the course which details what you
have accomplished on each phase (Data collection, analysis, supplementary materials, and your
presentation) of your field research project.


Researchers:
Section 02	Section 07	Section 11	Section 16	Section 17
Rubino
Dumas
Turgeon		Anderson	Libscomb
Krajewski	
			Anderson
Latreille	
			Moisson
	



FIELD RESEARCH PROJECTS
Information Sheet
IDEOLOGY AND THE MEDIA
DUE WEEK 14

Each field research project will be evaluated/graded according to the following criteria: 1) data
collection (25%), 2) data analysis (25%), 3) use of supplementary materials (25%), and 4) presentation
of findings (25%).  Your group will be required to fill out a grade sheet (one per group)  which explicitly
states what you have done for each phase of the project.   
  
DATA COLLECTION
What assumptions about the nature of the society and human nature underlie the judgments of  media
decision-makers?  This project entails:  1) interviews with representatives of various ideological streams
in print, radio, television media and 2) an ideological content analysis of media.  You are to describe the 
dominant perspectives in the media.  Describe what ideological perspectives are presented on the central
issues in public discourse.  Identify viewpoints outside the dominant ideological perspective.  Describe
their content and location in media.  This is a content analysis and will entail interviews with
representatives of the media.


DATA ANALYSIS

USE OF SUPPLEMENTARY MATERIALS

PRESENTATION OF THE FINDINGS

PROGRESS REPORT:
You will need to provide me with a progress report in the Week 6 of the course which details what you
have accomplished on each phase (Data collection, analysis, supplementary materials, and your
presentation) of your field research project.